Throwback Thursday – Old Florence School

Florence School

Florence School

Florence Township was originally divided into eight school districts. One room school houses were located throughout the district and served its students until a central building was built in the late 1880’s. This is the building that is pictured above.

This picture was submitted by Mrs. Nancy Sayler. This Florence school building was located on Florence-Wakeman Road, south of Florence Corners. The school was a two-story brick building which housed four grades on the first floor and the remaining students were taught on the upper floor.

Wood stoves provided heat until jacketed stoves were installed in 1910. Drinking water was carried from the town pump and a common dipper was used by all. After the Collinwood school fire in 1908, exit doors were made to open outward and fire escapes were installed.

On August 5, 1919 the building was struck by lightning and burned. While the building was being reconstructed, classes were held in the Methodist Church on Joppa Road, in Florence Town Hall, and some students paid tuition  ($36.00 a year) to attend Birmingham High School.

 

Class of 1934

Class of 1934

CLASS OF 1934: This picture of the Florence High School Class of 1934/35 comes from  Dale Hohler. Dale’s mother identifies the students in the picture as Mildred German, Wilma Davidson, Arlene Yates Gerber, Lucille Snellenberger Beurskin, Marie Shafts Hohler, Sarah Emma Toth Schultz, Willard Rickets, George Long, and Wilbur Hageman. It was taken by local photographer Rudy Moc in the Recitation room of the school.

The school reopened was utilized until 1938, when it was permanently closed.The Students were absorbed into the Birmingham school, or choose pay tuition to attend High School at Berlin Heights.  The Florence school building was used by The Florence Grange  until 1968.

“The disadvantage of men not knowing the past is that they do not know the present.” (G. K. Chesterton).

Information for this blog post was supplied by Mrs. Sayler, Florence Finished Yet Beginning Publiciation, 1982 and The Vermilion Views.